Baby factory: Institute wants passage of social work practitioners’ bill

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Dr Abdulhamid Bello, Director, Corporate Service and International Partnership, Chartered Institute of Social Work Professionals
Dr Abdulhamid Bello, Director, Corporate Service and International Partnership, Chartered Institute of Social Work Professionals

By Felicia Imohimi

An official of the Chartered Institute of Social Work Professionals has called for the quick passage of Chartered Institute of Social Work Practitioners of Nigeria Bill to curb the menace of baby factory. 

Dr Abdulhamid Bello, Director, Corporate Service and International Partnership of the institute made the call in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja.

Bello said the passage of the bill would address the challenges of child abuse, human trafficking, baby factory, among others in the country.

He said that lack of legislation had prevented social workers from effectively carrying out their duties.

The director noted that operators of many motherless babies’ homes and baby factories run such homes without identity for the purpose of child trafficking or use them for rituals.

He explained that the passage of the bill would give the practitioners legal backing that would enable the social workers to fish out operations of illegal orphanages and baby factories in the country.

The director lauded the House of Representatives for ensuring the bill passed through second reading.

Some women arrested at a baby factory
Some women arrested at a baby factory

Bello said that the institute had been in existence since 2009 but had no legal backing to effectively and judiciously carryout it duties in stemming the tides of modern day slavery.

He said that quick passage of the bill would protect the less privilege, bridge the disparity between the rural and urban dwellers as well as curb quackery in the profession.

NAN recalls that Hon. Sylvester Ogbaga of Abakaliki Federal Constituency on Feb. 21 moved a motion for passage of the bill for second reading, which was adopted by the House.

Ogbaga said that the institute would be self-funding unlike the Council for Social Work.

He said the bill when passed would enable social workers bring programmes of the government closer to the grassroots and assist the less privilege just as their counterparts do in developed world. 


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